Mobile Menu

Lola Levine, Drama Queen (Lola Levine, Book 2)

Rate This Book
[Total: 12    Average: 3.3/5]

about the book

lola-levine-drama-queen

 

 

Dear Diario,

Apparently, I’m not as dramatic as everyone seems to think. I completely FROZE during play auditions! Me! Nothing scares me! I can do a slide tackle in soccer (even though I’m not supposed to). I even like worms! But none of that matters.

Now I’m just Squirrel #2. Did I mention that’s a non-speaking role?

Bubbe says she’s still flying in for the play, so if nothing else, at least I can see grandma by being a part of this gig. Plus, not much can go wrong with a non-speaking role, right?

Shalom,
Lola Levineteachingbooks-book

about the author

Monica BrownMonica Brown was born and raised in California. Her father was a blend of European, Jewish, and Native American heritages, while her mother descended from mestiza Peruvian American families. Monica said she was a little different, always the quirky kid in class.

Monica earned a degree in English from the University of California. As a senior, she took her first Chicano literature class and was inspired. After graduation, Brown worked as a journalist for an American newspaper in Guadalajara. Though she enjoyed the writing portion of the job, she quickly realized that she didn’t have the “run towards danger” instinct that reporters need. So Monica focused once again on Chicano literature, earning her master’s degree and doctorate from Ohio State University.

When Monica became a parent nearly 15 years ago, she was surprised to find few children’s books with a Latino focus. When she finished writing a story with a Latina character, she was stunned that the book was rejected and that mixed heritage was still a controversial topic. Now Monica’s daughters are 12 and 14, and she is beginning to think about writing novels for children and teens. She hopes her books are a bridge between the Latino and other communities.

Currently, Monica is a professor of English at Northern Arizona University, specializing in U.S. Latino and Multicultural Literature. Monica loves to teach, but she really enjoys writing for children. She has received several awards for her bilingual books. Monica lives with her husband and two daughters in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Sources:
Author website
Author/Illustrator interview : HarperKids on YouTube
Author biography: Amazon
Author biography: Harper Collins

Also by Monica Brown:
Lola Levine and the Vacation Dream (Lola Levine, Book 5). Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. April 2017.
Lola Levine Meets Jelly and Bean (Lola Levine, Book 4). Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. February 2017.
Marisol McDonald and the Monster = Marisol McDonald y el monstruo. Children’s Book Press. 2016.
Lola Levine and the Ballet Scheme (Lola Levine, Book 3). Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. 2016.
Lola Levine Is Not Mean! (Lola Levine, Book 1). Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. 2015.
Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match = Marisol McDonald no combina. Children’s Book Press. 2011.
Marisol McDonald and the Clash Bash = Marisol McDonald y la fiesta sin igual. Children’s Book Press. 2011.
Pablo Neruda : Poet of the People. Henry Holt. 2011.teachingbooks-author

about the illustrator

angela-dominguez

 

Angela Dominguez was born in Mexico City and grew up in Texas. As a child, she loved reading, writing, and creating a mess while making pictures. She’s thrilled that she can do all three professionally.

While writing, Angela has to visualize the characters and really get to know them, so she’s often drawing and writing at the same time! After she has her doodles, she can really focus on the text. Then with the doodles and the text, she moves on to creating the illustrations.

Angela’s favorite medium is a combination of tissue paper, pencil, and ink. The smell of the pencils is amazing and the fact that there’s less control with the ink forces her to work boldly and confidently.

Her mom is a skilled knitter, so Angela really wanted to be good at it too, but was never able to get the hang of it. Instead she wrote and illustrated a book, Knit Together, to bring their skills together.

Angela lives in Brooklyn. When she’s not in her studio, she’s teaching part-time at the Academy of Art University.

 

Sources:
Illustrator website
Illustrator interview: Latinos in Kid Lit
Illustrator interview: The Children’s Book Review
Illustrator interview: Romelle Broas
Illustrator video interview: KidLit TV

Also by Angela Dominguez:
Lola Levine and the Vacation Dream (Lola Levine, Book 5) by Monica Brown. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. April 2017.
Lola Levine Meets Jelly and Bean (Lola Levine, Book 4) by Monica Brown. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. February 2017.
Lola Levine and the Ballet Scheme (Lola Levine, Book 3) by Monica Brown. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. 2016.
Mango, Abuela, and Me by Meg Medina. Candlewick Press. 2015.
Lola Levine Is Not Mean! (Lola Levine, Book 1) by Monica Brown. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. 2015.teachingbooks-illustrator

read more!

Juana-&-Lucas

 

Juana & Lucas by Juana Medina
Juana loves many things about her life in Bogotá, Colombia: eating Brussels sprouts, playing with her dog Lucas, and reading all about the comic book superhero Astroman. She does NOT like learning English. Will anything convince Juana that learning a confusing language can be useful? It looks like her abuelos have something in mind….

 

 

 

lola-levine-and-ballet-scheme

 

 

Lola Levine and the Ballet Scheme (Lola Levine, Book 3) by Monica Brown
New girl Bella drives Lola crazy! All Lola can see are the pink ribbons, the pink sweatshirt, and the pink tennis shoes. Pink! It’s so gross! Plus, Bella is a ballet dancer. Ballet isn’t nearly as hard as soccer, right? After a squabble lands the two in the principal’s office, their moms come up with a scheme to help the girls see how much they have in common, but they’re not going to like it…

 

 

louise-trapeze-is-totally-fearless

 

Louise Trapeze Is Totally 100% Fearless (Louise Trapeze, Book 1) by Micol Ostow
Louise’s parents are trapeze artists for a traveling circus, and now that she is almost seven, she can join them in the show.  But as she practices the night before her first performance, she doesn’t want to climb too high or fall into the net.  Not wanting to admit that she isn’t 100% fearless, she hides her tutu so she can’t perform.  But will that solve her problem?